Improving your Customer Service by using Social Media: Part One (Facebook)

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Have you ever considered how you can improve your levels of customer service through your use of social media? Not only that, but potential customers will be able to gauge how important your company considers good customer service to be and how it is perceived within your company. In short, they will get a sense of  how well or how poorly they will be looked after if they buy your products or services.

Do not be afraid of negative reviews, negative tweets or negative updates to your Facebook page – you can turn a negative into a positive by addressing the problem and you can also help to spread the word when you get positive feedback.

I’m going to look at various social media platforms in turn over a series of four blog posts: Facebook, Blog, Twitter and Linked In/Reviews

Part One – Facebook

A customer or a potential customer can really get a sense of your company’s respect for their customers from your Facebook page.  I’m sure many companies do not intend for their brand to be represented poorly on their facebook page and it may not reflect a poor level of customer service at all (indeed, their customer service may be excellent in many ways) but if they are not using social media effectively and properly, it can reflect poorly on them.

Always, always acknowledge when someone posts an update on your page.  If it is a general comment, then click ‘like’ or respond in a friendly and polite tone.  If they are complimenting your service or your products, always thank them and say you are glad they enjoyed it.  If it is a complaint, (have a strategy planned in advance) always respond in a constructive way, in a way that will calm them down, assuring them that you will prevent it happening again or that you will correct the error or you will look into it and Do It!

I have looked at some pages belonging to big brands, companies that are spending thousands on television, radio and print advertising and they are not responding to their customers on their facebook pages – whether the updates are negative or positive.

The Mr. Tayto theme park facebook page has almost 200,000 fans and facebook is a wonderful way for this company to get visitors back again and let them know about upcoming promotions and events.  However, many people have left complaints about waiting times at one of the rides, others have posted questions, more people have complimented them on providing them with a great day out and very few have been acknowledged, let alone responded to.

We actually had a wonderful day at the Tayto Park during the summer and the staff were so friendly and helpful that I really think this is a genuine shame that it is reflecting badly on their brand. What do you think? Do you think a big brand that is still growing their business should be interacting more with their fans?

I  love the Nicholas Mosse facebook page – here the administrator is really engaging with ‘likers’, responding to their comments and updates. Always cheerful, not pretending to be Nicholas himself, always helpful and it is creating such a welcoming atmosphere on the page.

When I look at the Nicholas Mosse page, the image that comes to my mind is of the Seven Dwarves singing as they work or Santa’s workshop – as the potters pot and paint in their workshop!  It certainly gives the impression that should I purchase something that arrives damaged or flawed that they would replace it and certainly look after my concerns.

With comments and updates appearing now in the Ticker feed, evidence of good or bad customer service is going to be even more apparent to Facebook users which is certainly something to bear in mind.

If you want to know more about representing your brand through facebook, do check out the spiderworking blog too.

Don’t be afraid of social media – embrace it and it will increase the brand awareness of your company in a positive light.

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Posted in Social Media Platforms
  • http://monawise.wordpress.com WiseMona

    I am loving this Lorna. I do agree with you about large brands that do not take care of their peeps on Facebook. And now I am going to ‘Like’ Nicholas Mosse Pottery!

    • http://ouradoptivejourney.wordpress.com Lorna

      Good to hear Móna and yes, delighted you are going to ‘like’ NM :)

  • http://twitter.com/JBBC Marie Ennis-O’Connor (@JBBC)

    You raise some great points here Lorna and once again, we see, how easy it is to set up a blog, a twitter or facebook account, but how much work it can be to maintain it. It requires perhaps even greater commitment to customer service as it is there for everyone to see how a company or organization handles their customers comments or queries. Looking forward to the next in your series of posts on customer service through social media.

    • http://ouradoptivejourney.wordpress.com Lorna

      I agree Marie, the thing is that, particularly for new likers, they will view the page and see all the unanswered updates and comments – not a good first impression if that is the case.

  • Pingback: How to improve your Customer Service using social media – Part 2 (Twitter) « Write On Track

  • http://nenaghgal.blogspot.com Lisa McGee aka Nenaghgal

    Great tips Lorna. It obviously makes a difference when the adminstrator interacts with the people leaving comments. I agree, you just have to start using FB and stop being afraid- I’ve seen too many businesses hold back because they are afraid of what to do! Great advice.

  • Pingback: How to improve your Customer Service by using Social Media: Part 3 – Blogging « Write On Track

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